Wild Greens Pesto Cooking Video

Part 2 of Liza de Guia’s video of me is up on Huffington Post. We came back to my kitchen after foraging and I made a wild greens pesto to go with some roasted root vegetables. If you didn’t see it when it first went up on Food Curated, I hope you’ll enjoy it. And even if you did, please take a moment to leave a comment on Huff, give it an FB “like”, become a fan…spread the word and thanks!
Leda

Earth Day Thoughts

Earthrise over the lunar landscape
Earthrise over the lunar landscape

Today is Earth Day. I don’t usually do anything special for it, but I think it’s great that the occasion gets the press to cover environmental issues more than they usually do. Maybe that gets people thinking about their relationship to this planet, our home.

It got me thinking.

What makes someone think it’s “okay” to pollute or to gobble up natural resources faster than they can be renewed? What makes it “okay” for people from one continent to step in and claim the resources of another continent? First you decide that those other people aren’t really people, or at least not on the same level that you are. Then you give yourself permission to take, and take, and take.

But what is taken didn’t come from the people, the humans. It came from Earth. All the oil, gas, food, water, land; the sand that made the glass I’m drinking my wine out of and the grapes that made the wine, all that came from the Earth.

Earth is such a magnificent closed system: trash becomes compost becomes nourishment for new life. Nothing wasted, nothing lost. But we’re maxing her out. She can’t keep up with what we’re dumping on her. If I were the Earth, I would get myself out of this abusive relationship. A few more earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, and volcanic eruptions should do it.

I said, “what is taken didn’t come from the people, the humans. It came from the earth.” But what are humans if not one of the animals of this planet? Yes, we seem to think and plan on a scale beyond that of other mammals. But babies still come out of wombs and we still need to include bathrooms in our houses, and the bottom line is we are born and we will die. We will be compost, and this may sound weird but I actually think that’s beautiful. I’d like to feed future gardens.

There is a slim chance that enough (not all) humans will realize that not only other humans but other species on this planet have rights, that the planet itself has rights. If we realize that soon enough, Earth may not need to shake us off like a failed experiment or a case of the flu.

I like to think she’s giving us a chance still, and that maybe I’m helping a little, or at least not hurting.

Happy Earth Day, everyone!

P.S.-tomorrow’s foraging tour is rain or shine!

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The Locavore’s Handbook: The Busy Person’s Guide to Eating Local on a Budget

Botany, Ballet, & Dinner from Scratch: A Memoir with Recipes

Foraging & Cooking Up an Early Spring Recipe

march-forageI went foraging with Liza de Guia of Food Curated and we scored some early spring greens and field garlic. Here’s the video:

Urban Spring Foraging (Part One): Harvesting Wild Greens in Prospect Park w/Leda Meredith

Then we went back to my place and turned what we’d foraged into a wild greens pesto to jazz up the storage crops I’d bought at the farmers’ market. Let’s face it, the root vegetables and apples from last years harvest are getting a little boring. But the fresh, earthy taste of the first wild greens of spring turned them into something new to enjoy. Here’s the cooking video:

Urban Spring Foraging (Part Two): A Wild Greens Pesto Recipe w/Leda Meredith

Hope your harvests are abundant,

Leda

The Locavore’s Handbook: The Busy Person’s Guide to Eating Local on a Budget

Botany, Ballet, & Dinner from Scratch: A Memoir with Recipes

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